What kind of examples are there in video course : "Get Started with Go" ?

Hi,

I just got an email from O'Reilly about this new video course "Get Started with Go
From Hello World to Writing Highly Concurrent Programs". I have seen the free videos and mostly like all of it. The trouble is, the contents do not tell me exactly what kind of examples and code will be developed / shown.

For example : " In this course, host John Graham-Cumming teaches you the complete language, and shows you how to use Go’s two special features: goroutines for concurrency and interfaces for composition."

Excellent, but what would John be developing? Unfortunately, many a courses show something very simple to explain some concept and not something from the real world ( or close it ) programming.

I am very very interested in buying this course but please help me decide by giving some more details. Anybody have any details?

Regards,

PKB
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  • Hello,

    Thanks for your interest in Introduction to Go Programming. From the catalog page I found some information that I hope you will find helpful concerning what you will learn with this video:

    "Learn about variables, simple types, and declarations
    Understand Go’s control structures, including if and switch statements
    Create Go functions, and learn how multiple arguments and return values are handled
    Learn built-in types, including maps (associative arrays) and its powerful slice type
    Use goroutines and channels for easy concurrency
    Dive into Go’s other great power: interfaces (its approach to object orientation)
    Learn about Go’s tool chain and its built-in support for unit testing"

    More information and some samples can be found here:

    http://shop.oreilly.com/product/06369...

    Have a great day!

    Best regards,
    Paul Fichera
    O'Reilly Media
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  • I hope that my examples are close to real world, but of course they are small because no one wants to sit through 10 hours of me writing some massive real program and debugging it.

    For concurrency I use examples of retrieving multiple web pages in parallel using goroutines. Later I show how to use Go's net/http server to build a web server and for packages and interfaces I have a 'toy' example that illustrates all the concepts using poems (a poem is a slice of stanzas which is a slice of lines). The poetry example also shows how to handle reading stdin.

    It's true that none of these examples are _real_ programs, but they are all based on real programs and I hope that they will show you how to program and Go without being overly simplistic.

    At dotGo in Paris I did an example of a real Go program that was only 75 lines long. Sure, it was short, but it was real.
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  • Thank you, John. That is definitely helpful. Appreciate your detailed reply.
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